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Patriots vs Ravens advanced stats: Chase Winovich was unblockable against Baltimore

Related: Patriots vs Ravens snap counts: Young talent helps slow down Baltimore’s offense

NFL: NOV 15 Ravens at Patriots Photo by Fred Kfoury III/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

For the first time all season, the New England Patriots have won back-to-back games to improve their record to 4-5. The second of those victories came on Sunday Night Football against a Baltimore Ravens team that entered the contest as a one-touchdown favorite. However, New England played its most complete game of the season to come away with a 23-17 win that saw the team play some impressive football in all three phases.

With that said, let’s dive into the advanced statistics from the game. Before analyzing the numbers, however, we will have to explain two of the categories you will meet here that go beyond conventional statistics:

  • OSR: OSR stands for “Offensive Success Rate” and is based on Bill Connelly’s work at SB Nation. It aims to characterize how successful a play was relative to the down and distance in which it took place. For a play be considered a success it will have to gain at least 50 percent of the necessary yardage on first down (i.e. at least 5 yards on 1st-and-10), 70 percent on second down (i.e. at least 7 yards on 2nd-and-10), and 100 percent on both third and fourth down (i.e. at least 10 yards on 3rd-and-10 and 4th-and-10).
  • EPA: EPA stands for “Expected Points Added” and is based on the work done by Ben Baldwin through his website rbsdm.com. EPA aims at measuring the value of individual offensive plays in terms of points by calculating what is expected to happen on an individual play depending on down, distance, field position and game situation and contrasting it with the eventual outcome.

With that out of the way, let’s dig into the stats.

Quarterbacks

Quarterback statistics

Player Snaps Attempts Completions Yards Touchdowns Interceptions Drops Throwaways Pressure rate Rating OSR EPA/Play
Player Snaps Attempts Completions Yards Touchdowns Interceptions Drops Throwaways Pressure rate Rating OSR EPA/Play
Cam Newton 58 17 13 118 1 0 0 1 22.2% 114.3 52.9% 0.22
Jakobi Meyers 57 1 1 24 1 0 0 0 100.0% 158.3 100.0% 3.52

Ever since the second half of the Patriots’ close Week 8 loss in Buffalo, Cam Newton has played some solid football and the game against the Ravens was no exception. While asked to drop back just 18 times, he was generally efficient when asked to throw the ball: Newton completed 13 of his 17 pass attempts for 118 yards and a touchdown — all while posting a success rate of 52.9 and an EPA per play of 0.22. Those numbers may not stand out, but they certainly played an important role to complement New England’s rushing attack and round off the offense.

For the third time this season — not counting his one-week absence following his Covid-19 diagnosis —Newton was not the only Patriot asked to throw the ball. After Julian Edelman and Jarrett Stidham attempted passes in Week 6 and Week 7, respectively, it was Jakobi Meyers’ turn this time. The college quarterback-turned-wide receiver threw a perfect 24-yard touchdown to Rex Burkhead, despite getting pressured up front on the trick play.

Ball carriers

Ball carrier statistics

Player Snaps Attempts Yards Yards after Contact Touchdowns Fumbles OSR EPA/Play
Player Snaps Attempts Yards Yards after Contact Touchdowns Fumbles OSR EPA/Play
Cam Newton 58 9 23 4 0 0 44.4% 0.05
Damien Harris 32 22 121 49 0 0 50.0% 0.06
Rex Burkhead 20 6 31 12 0 0 66.7% 0.25

New England’s running game had another highly productive day, despite going up against one of the best run defenses in the NFL this season. Damien Harris led the group with 121 yards on 22 attempts, but the most efficient back was once again Rex Burkhead: he registered only six carries, but posted a 66.7 percent OSR as well as an EPA of 0.25 per play. For as impressive as Harris has looked since taking over the lead role in Week 4, Burkhead remains the Patriots’ best all-around back.

Pass receivers

Pass receiver statistics

Player Snaps Targets Completions Yards Yards after Catch Touchdowns Interceptions Rating Drops OSR EPA/Play
Player Snaps Targets Completions Yards Yards after Catch Touchdowns Interceptions Rating Drops OSR EPA/Play
Jakobi Meyers 57 7 5 59 17 0 0 96.7 0 57.1% 0.42
Ryan Izzo 54 1 1 20 15 0 0 118.8 0 100.0% 1.69
Jakob Johnson 37 2 2 20 12 0 0 108.3 0 100.0% 1.32
Rex Burkhead 20 5 4 35 17 2 0 135.4 0 40.0% 0.51
James White 10 2 2 8 11 0 0 83.3 0 50.0% 0.10

The Patriots received some solid contributions out of their pass-catching group, despite only one wide receiver touching the ball all day. That wideout, Jakobi Meyers, once again led the club in receptions and yards — continuing his strong stretch of play. Meyers is not the only receiver to stand out, as the aforementioned Rex Burkhead also played a big role by catching both of the team’s receiving touchdowns.

Ryan Izzo, Jakob Johnson and James White were also generally effective when trusted with the ball.

Pass protection/run blocking

Pass protection/run blocking statistics

Player Snaps Sacks QB Hits Hurries Stuffed runs
Player Snaps Sacks QB Hits Hurries Stuffed runs
Michael Onwenu 58 1 0 0 0
Joe Thuney 58 0 1 0 0
David Andrews 58 0 0 0 0
Isaiah Wynn 58 0 0 0 0
Shaq Mason 58 0 0 0 0
Ryan Izzo 54 0 0 1 0
Jakob Johnson 37 0 0 0 1
N'Keal Harry 35 0 0 0 1
Damien Harris 32 0 0 1 0

Going up against one of the best defenses in the entire league, New England’s offensive line had a banner day. The unit, which saw all five of its starters go wire-to-wire for a second straight week, helped the team gain 175 yards on 37 carries for one touchdown and a very solid 4.7 yards per attempt. It was no less impressive in pass protection, giving up just five disruptions on 19 pass plays — just two of which courtesy of the line itself.

Pass rush/run defense

Pass rush/run defense statistics

Player Snaps Sacks QB Hits Hurries Stuffed runs
Player Snaps Sacks QB Hits Hurries Stuffed runs
Chase Winovich 65 0 0 10 0
Kyle Dugger 56 0 0 1 0.5
John Simon 41 0 0 1 1
Lawrence Guy 35 0 0 1 0
Byron Cowart 29 0 0 0 1
Josh Uche 21 1 0 1 0
Carl Davis 19 0 0 0 0.5

While other players also deserve to be mentioned — rookies Kyle Dugger and Josh Uche had some positive moments — one name clearly stands out above the rest when it comes to the Patriots’ pass rush: Chase Winovich. The second-year man, who played a career-high 98.5 percent of defensive snaps, finished with 10 quarterback disruptions and was generally unblockable. No matter where he lined up in the defensive formation, he made an impact by putting the heat on Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson.

Pass coverage

Pass coverage statistics

Player Snaps Targets Completions Yards Touchdowns Interceptions Pass Breakups Pass interference Rating OSR
Player Snaps Targets Completions Yards Touchdowns Interceptions Pass Breakups Pass interference Rating OSR
J.C. Jackson 66 3 1 14 0 1 0 0 9.7 33.3%
Jason McCourty 66 2 1 10 0 0 1 0 64.6 0.0%
Devin McCourty 66 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 39.6 0.0%
Kyle Dugger 56 2 1 8 0 0 0 0 60.4 0.0%
John Simon 41 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 79.2 0.0%
Myles Bryant 6 1 1 9 0 0 0 0 104.2 100.0%

Given Baltimore’s impressive ground game, the Patriots decided to rely mostly on zone coverage and only went to man-to-man looks in select select situations like some third downs. Whenever they did, however, they found success: Jackson went just 5-for-10 against New England’s man looks for just 45 yards and a 20 percent success rate (his first touchdown pass also came against man, but it was more of a run play masquerading as a pass in the books).

All in all, New England’s coverage unit bounced back nicely after a so-and-so performance versus the New York Jets six days earlier.