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Patriots reportedly host veteran cornerback Brian Poole on a free agency workout

Related: Patriots reportedly host two free agents, including familiar defensive lineman Nick Thurman

New York Jets v Buffalo Bills Photo by Timothy T Ludwig/Getty Images

The New England Patriots are apparently not done addressing their cornerback position. One day after promoting second-year man Myles Bryant from the practice squad to the active roster, the Patriots are reportedly hosting a six-year veteran on a free agency visit.

According to his agent, Drew Rosenhaus, Brian Poole will work out with the team on Wednesday. While such a workout does not necessarily need to lead to a contract being signed either for the practice squad or active roster, it does show that the Patriots still see some potential to bolster the position.

An undrafted free agent out of Florida, Poole entered the league with the Atlanta Falcons in 2016. He spent three years in Atlanta, appearing in a combined 52 regular season and playoff games; he registered four interceptions and fumble recoveries each. In 2019, he joined the New York Jets as a free agent, adding 23 more games and three more interceptions to his résumé.

Earlier this year, Poole left New York to sign a one-year deal with the New Orleans Saints. However, he was moved to injured reserve in August for undisclosed reasons and eventually released last week.

Primarily a slot cornerback throughout his career, Poole would help bolster a cornerback group that has had some depth issues as of late.

While the team is set at the starting spots with J.C. Jackson and Jalen Mills as the top pairing on the outside and Jonathan Jones in the slot, the depth behind the trio is dubious. Joejuan Williams and Myles Bryant have yet to prove themselves as consistent rotational options; rookie Shaun Wade has no NFL game experience and has missed the last two weeks with a concussion; Justin Bethel is primarily a special teamer

Adding an experienced player such as Poole to the equation could be a cost-effective way of improving the group.